Customer Service Agents with Guns and Badges

I often get asked about how we handle law enforcement at privately-operated public parks.  After all, most state-employed rangers have law enforcement credentials, and our employees don’t.

But most rangers have law enforcement credentials because of the rewards for having these, not because there is so much demand in most parks for law enforcement (we run a few urban parks that are an exception to this). Park employees who obtain law enforcement credentials get monetary rewards in terms of higher pay and access to more lucrative law enforcement pension plans.  Some also get psychological rewards from being able to carry a gun and a badge.  In most cases, though, we can easily work with local law enforcement to set up procedures to handle the few law enforcement situations that arise.

The other answer I give folks is that it is a bad idea to try to provide customer service with law enforcement officers.  In many cases, the approach to problems is different.  Can you imagine McDonald’s employees who constantly wrote you citations for illegal parking?

Here is an extreme example:

A Montara man walking two lapdogs off leash was hit with an electric-shock gun by a National Park Service ranger after allegedly giving a false name and trying to walk away, authorities said Monday.

The park ranger encountered Gary Hesterberg with his two small dogs Sunday afternoon at Rancho Corral de Tierra, which was recently incorporated into the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, said Howard Levitt, a spokesman for the park service.

Hesterberg, who said he didn’t have identification with him, allegedly gave the ranger a false name, Levitt said.

The ranger, who wasn’t identified, asked Hesterberg to remain at the scene, Levitt said. He tried several times to leave, and finally the ranger “pursued him a little bit and she did deploy her” electric-shock weapon, Levitt said. “That did stop him.” …

Hesterberg, whose age was not available, was arrested on suspicion of failing to obey a lawful order, having dogs off-leash and knowingly providing false information, Levitt said.

Arresting and tasering people for off-leash dogs is absurd in the extreme.  We have this problem all the time with dogs – everyone thinks their own beloved dog deserves a special exception to the rules.  But we work hard to get compliance in a friendly way.  Some people ignore us, and when they do, we try to remember that its just a freaking off-leash dog, not a serial killer on the loose.  I could only imagine us calling out law enforcement if our employee was being ignored and the dog was being a particular nuisance or the person was known to have ignored the rule on repeated visits.